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Are You Ready for the New Police Record Check Changes?

Posted By Adam Dias, July 3, 2018
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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

 

Criminal record checks are changing this November and it’s important to stay updated so that you can get the information you need to protect your staff, your volunteers, and the people in your care. We’re here to walk you through why and how police record checks are changing and to make sure you’re ready for the shift.

 

Why change police record checks? 

 

Three years ago the Police Record Check Reform Act was passed, detailing the changes that we’re now facing—this November it will come into full effect, being enforced and standardized across the province. The act was created for three main purposes—to introduce a new option for police record checks, the criminal record and judicial matters check; to protect the privacy of those being checked; and to standardize the record check process and the information available across the province.

 

How are the record checks changing?

 

Criminal record check: The most basic form of record check, the criminal record check will go unchanged. It will continue to contain a criminal conviction summary from the local and national database as well as any finding of guilt under the Youth Criminal Justice Act.

 

Criminal record and judicial matters check: A new addition to the available options, this check expands upon the criminal record check by also including any absolute discharges from the last year, conditional discharges from the last three years, outstanding charges and warrants, and any court orders that have not been withdrawn and were not made under the Mental Health Act.

 

Vulnerable sector checkThe most comprehensive check available, the vulnerable sector check will include all of the above information as well as any convictions with findings of “not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder” from the last five years.

The vulnerable sector check will no longer include any non-conviction information unless it has been authorized for exceptional disclosure. Non-conviction information will be given if the police check provider has reasonable cause to believe the individual presents a risk of harm to a child or vulnerable person and when the alleged victim was a child or vulnerable person.


Want to make sure you’re getting the most accurate picture of your applicants? Join me at our next workshop on July 19 to learn more about police checks and the Ontario Human Rights Code. Register now!

   

As Volunteer Toronto's Training Specialist, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  Background Screening for volunteers  how to screen a volunteer  Personal Information Protection  Police Records Checks  Police screening  volunteer management  volunteer managers  Volunteer Police Records Checks  volunteer program  volunteer recruitment  volunteer screening 

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