Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
Community Search
Inspiring Action: Blog for Volunteer Managers
Blog Home All Blogs

How To Keep Your Volunteer Program Compliant With The Sexual Violence & Harassment Action Plan Act

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, December 2, 2016
Updated: December 5, 2016
 Sexual Violence & Harassment Action Plan Act

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

 

On September 8, 2016, the Sexual Violence & Harassment Action Plan Act (also known as Bill 132) came into force. Here’s what you need to know to ensure your volunteer program is compliant and you’re protecting volunteers, employees and board members from sexual harassment and violence.

 The Act made changes to the Occupational Health and Safety Act to:

  1. Expand the definition of workplace harassment to specifically include workplace sexual harassment, and
  2. Determine the obligations of employers to be more proactive in addressing harassment in the workplace

There are a few things you’ll need to do to make sure that your organization is complying with Bill 132, and they involve volunteers along with employees.

 

Policy – Including Sexual Harassment

First, your organization must review and update your Workplace Violence & Harassment Policy to include the definition of workplace sexual harassment. Here’s the definition from the Ministry of Labour:

“(a) engaging in a course of vexatious comment or conduct against a worker in a workplace because of sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression, where the course of comment or conduct is known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome, or

(b) making a sexual solicitation or advance where the person making the solicitation or advance is in a position to confer, grant or deny a benefit or advancement to the worker and the person knows or ought reasonably to know that the solicitation or advance is unwelcome;”

 

Program – Complaints, Investigations & Results

 Next, you’ll need to create a written program to implement this policy by creating mechanisms for volunteers, employees and board members to make complaints and report incidents. This program should clearly explain the process for how complaints are made and how they’ll be responded to.

 Your organization must take complaints seriously and implement an investigation and reporting process for every complaint. Failure to do so may result in the Ministry of Labour engaging a third party for investigation – with the cost falling entirely on your organization. This investigation process should resolve the complaint, and your policy should address the repercussions for individuals who have been proven to sexually harass others in your organization.

 

Training – Letting Everyone Know

 The last compliance measure is that you must train everyone – staff, volunteers and board members – about your Workplace Violence & Harassment Policy. Your training should answer these questions:

·       What is sexual harassment?

·       How will volunteers make complaints and/or report incidents?

·       What will happen after a volunteer makes a complaint?

·       How will results of the investigation be shared?

 

The Ministry of Labour has produced a Code of Practice to help you understand your requirements. Our online Legislation course can also help you understand the many obligations your organization has to ensure a compliant volunteer program. If you have any other questions about implementing this new change to Ontario law, contact Sammy at sfeilchenfeld@volunteertoronto.ca or 416-961-6888 x235.

 

Get in-person volunteer management advice from our experts!

As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  Ontario Government Legislation  Sexual Harassment  Sexual Violence & Harassment Action Plan Act  Volunteer Assessment  volunteer engagement  Volunteer Management  Volunteer Program Policies  Volunteer Survey 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Design Thinking: An Innovative Way To Approach Your Volunteer Program

Posted By Christine Martin, Senior Manager, Volunteer Engagement, Evergreen, November 18, 2016
 Ways to innovate your volunteer program

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

Design is everywhere in our lives – from websites to buildings to smartphones. The mindsets and processes that have been behind them are now being applied to everything from the retail experience to health care to education. But what about volunteer engagement and the non-profit sector more broadly? It’s time to add to our toolboxes in this area so we can adapt and improve to meet the challenges of an ever-changing sector, in an ever-changing world.

But what is design thinking?  At its heart, it’s a practice that uses a host of creative tools and approaches to identify and solve problems for the benefit of users. It’s about improving products, processes and services.  It’s collaborative. It is human-centred. It’s creative. It focuses on action.  And it has huge potential to transform volunteer engagement. 

We all want volunteer engagement to be amazing and add value – for our volunteers, for our staff and of course, for our organization’s clients and mission.    In a way, each of these groups are “users” of volunteer services. Through applying design thinking, we can open up new possibilities for these users, resulting in a better experience for staff and volunteers. At Evergreen, it’s about putting myself in the volunteer’s shoes – what is it like when they look for an opportunity? What are they experiencing on their first day of volunteering? How might we make it better?

By exploring what’s possible, looking at the whole system and digging into our challenges, we can take volunteering to a whole new level. So, pull together a diverse, collaborative team and follow these key stages for a design-thinking approach:


EMPATHIZE: Really understand your users and their experiences and challenges


DEFINE: Use this understanding to be clear about the real problem you want to address


IDEATE: Come up with as many solutions as possible – encourage divergent thinking, no judgement, then narrow it down.


PROTOTYPE: Explore how the possible solution might look; work using physical objects or models.  This will help stimulate better conversation to surface new insights, questions and needs.


TEST: Try it out with your user – how is it working?  How can we improve?

 

The design thinking world is full of tools. Tools like brainstorming and interviewing will feel familiar while point-of-view madlibs or how to draw toast might seem downright strange. However, two key tools really stand out with potential for innovating volunteer engagement:  empathy mapping and journey mapping. 

 

EMPATHY MAPPING

Using deep knowledge of your volunteers, ideally from direct observation and interaction, you can synthesize this knowledge into four key quadrants: what a volunteer is saying and doing and what it seems they are thinking or feeling – use this to help identify needs and insights better.

Here's an example of what an Empathy map can look like:

 Empathy Map Example
 From David Leetch Ed Tech

 

Here’s a few more examples of Empathy Maps:

DSchool

Desiging A New Way of Thinking: A New Approach to Solving Social Problems - Charity Village



JOURNEY MAPPING

Imagining a persona of a volunteer, map out their actions/experiences with you as a volunteer over time. Along a parallel timeline, map the moments when the volunteer is interacting with you organization – virtually or in person and what the volunteer attitudes and needs might be at various steps. Where are the pain points?  What stands out? What are possible solutions?

Here's one example of a journey map:

 Journey Map Example
 From 7 Things To Consider When Designing A CX Journey Mapping Workshop

 

Here’s a few more examples: 

Designing CX

IDEO

 

The field of design thinking is rich and deep and proving to be incredibly powerful for innovation and for organizations to thrive. Imagine if this were applied to how we engage volunteers and work with stakeholders and clients. Imagine if we could quickly identify and adapt to emerging trends and opportunities.  Imagine if you had a ready toolkit to identify the hard questions and transform your organization.  Imagine.

 

Christine Martin is the leader and designer behind Evergreen’s dynamic and varied volunteer engagement which engages over 7000 volunteer a year in about 70 different roles across the country, and especially at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto. She’s committed to equipping and empowering volunteers and staff to reach their potential in partnering together to achieve great things. She loves to apply innovation, facilitation and collaboration approaches to all aspects of her work and to share this with others to help them thrive.

Tags:  Design thinking  empathy mapping  innovative thinking for volunteer management  journey mapping  volunteer management  volunteer program 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

INFOGRAPHIC: How Setting Expectations Can Make Giving Volunteer Feedback A Breeze

Posted By Kasandra James, Subscriptions Coordinator, August 4, 2016
Updated: August 3, 2016
 

Infographic: How Setting Expectations Can Make Giving Volunteer Feedback A Breeze 

 


As Volunteer Toronto’s Subscriptions Coordinator, Kasandra James is the first point of contact for non-profits looking for support. She facilitates monthly Subscriber Circles - discussion groups for managers and coordinators of volunteers, contributes to our Sector Space newsletter and social media communications, and makes sure our subscriptions package continues to help non-profit organizations build capacity through volunteer involvement. 

 

Tags:  Volunteer Feedback  Volunteer Management  Volunteer Program 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Stop Trying To Do It All! Making The Case For Volunteer Management Assistants

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, June 23, 2016
Updated: June 22, 2016
 Volunteer Management Assistant

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes 

As a manager of volunteers, you have a lot on your plate: planning volunteer roles, making position descriptions, recruiting, screening, matching, supervising…the list goes on! Sometimes, it’s too much to handle, but there’s a way to get the help you need through the resources you already have: a volunteer assistant!

You could engage one or more volunteers to assist you in aspects of your role. By creating a new set of responsibilities and duties for volunteer assistants, you’re allowing more volunteers to gain worthwhile skills and experience and a deeper understanding of the world of volunteer management. What can these volunteer assistants actually do to support you?

  • Contact volunteers for interviews, check-ins and/or follow-ups
  • Schedule volunteers and events
  • Manage your volunteer database through data entry & clean-up
  • Review volunteer policies & procedures and recommend updates
  • Review and prepare position postings
  • Read potential volunteer applications
  • Contribute suggestions and help make changes to improve the volunteer program
  • Assist with volunteer program evaluation

...and more!

Think about the different parts of your role that you could use some extra help for and if those aspects can be supported by a volunteer. Remember to consider your own policies, such as confidentiality and privacy, to ensure you’re not breaking any rules by having your volunteers support the different functions of your role.

 

Making the Case for Support

Now that you know the benefits of having a volunteer assistant and what they might be able to do to help you, how do you make the case for this type of support? With every volunteer role, you’re ensuring the volunteer program strives to meet your mission. A volunteer assistant is a highly-valued and important role that helps you sustain and improve the volunteer program while also expanding your and the organization’s capacity. It allows the volunteer program to get more done and also gives your existing volunteers new leadership opportunities and pathways. Finally, it creates transparency around your program and helps volunteers feel connected to the change-making process that can improve their work and the entire organization.

Since volunteer engagement is already at the heart of your role, it might be time to bring a volunteer on to help you develop your volunteer program. Let these volunteers in and your entire organization can be better for it!

 



As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  need assistance  office assistants  overworked  Volunteer assistant  Volunteer Management 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Screening, dating or both: How to approach your volunteer interview

Posted By Lori Gotlieb, Lori Gotlieb Consulting, May 26, 2016

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

Although volunteer management processes are as varied as the organizations that use them, one process that is usually consistent is the interview. This stage of the volunteer cycle is key to learning about the volunteer: who they are and how they can make a difference in a meaningful way. But standard interviews may not reveal all the unique skills and capabilities that a volunteer could contribute.

If we want to learn about what a volunteer can do for our organization, rather than whether or not they’re a good fit for a specific, defined role, we need to have an open mind to see where the conversation leads. It is your role to set the stage for the interview to encourage dialogue and comfort so the potential volunteer can feel comfortable to discuss their:

  • Skills
  • Experience
  • Motivation
  • Hobbies
  • Expectations
  • Personal goals
  • Passions

So, the question is: are we taking this time to only screen or are we allowing a conversation to start where each party learns from each other and you “get to know each other”, like on a first date?

The first date concept is more of a conversation, where both parties are exploring the opportunity to partner in a mutually beneficial relationship. These conversations are more exploratory in nature and may require another meeting to agree on a specific role or project for the volunteer.

 

What can you do to begin this process?

  • Build an interview process that allows for a blend of exploratory questions and basic knowledge transfer between you and the volunteer to lay the foundation of the conversation.

  • Keep the conversation going; you may identify a role for the volunteer at that meeting, but you may want to take their information and explore internally where their skills may be of greatest value

  • Be open to new ideas

  • Train those who interview to be creative and open-minded

 

As you start this process and grow this culture of creativity in your volunteer program, you will find that your colleagues will consider how volunteers can be an asset to their programs and reach out to you for your expertise in connecting unique volunteers to unique roles.

Hopefully this will be a beginning of a wonderful relationship!

 

Lori Gotlieb is the President of Lori Gotlieb Consulting as well as co-developer and faculty member for Humber College Volunteer Management Leadership Certificate. She is a volunteer management expert who provides a unique concierge service to her clients. She is also an internationally published author and workshop facilitator who has taught workshops to many diverse audiences across North America. In 2012, Lori was the recipient of the Linda Buchanan Award for Excellence in Volunteer Management. 

You can reach here at  lorigotliebconsulting@gmail.com 


Tags:  how to screen a volunteer  volunteer interviews  volunteer management  volunteer screening 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

What's The Best Volunteer Management Database For You - Tips From The Bottom Up

Posted By Claire McWatt, Project Coordinator, May 19, 2016
Updated: May 18, 2016
 

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

In our most recent workshop, Leading Beyond the Core, the Grassroots Growth team explored the vast expanse of online databases for managing volunteers. Grassroots groups, like all non-profits, have to make decisions about how to best manage their lists and online presence. New software products are coming out every day, and features change at such a rapid pace that it can be a huge challenge to keep up. So, how do you choose the right content management system? The answer is: by being a smart consumer.

Back in the day, volunteers were managed using lists and contact sheets. They were mobilized by making phone calls. Computers brought us Excel spreadsheets, scheduling apps and e-mail, making things a lot easier. In the world of Web 2.0, we’ve seen all kinds of volunteer management software emerge, with a litany of shiny new capabilities, for a wide range of prices. Today, platforms such as Volgistics, Better Impact, and so many others compete in a saturated market for our precious business.

The market has changed a lot. We now have options that integrate all the features needed to run a non-profit and/or campaign into a one-stop-shop platform. Nationbuilder, widely becoming the benchmark, is a very popular integrated option. Volunteer managers are also testing new software, like Timecounts, with the capability to send text messages and tag volunteers with a wide range of extra skills.

For grassroots groups, there are five key points to remember when considering your management needs:

1. What can you realistically afford?

Platforms range from free to thousands of dollars per month. Some bill annually, some monthly. It’s great to have everything, but your budget will be a big factor in what you ultimately choose.

2. What are the needs of your organization?

Some platforms are best for mobilizing people, others for managing memberships. The type of work you do will factor heavily into what kind of product best meets your unique needs.

3. How many volunteers do you have in total?

If you have a lot of volunteers, standalone volunteer management software may be very useful. The more volunteers you have, the more likely it is to be necessary, and the more likely you are to need one that has more fancy features.

4. What are your shift-management needs?

If you need to manage a lot of volunteers at the same time (usually for events), you may want standalone volunteer management software, or at least the free or paid add-ons available in integrated products. Further, if you need to manage volunteers across different areas, standalone software is probably best for you.
 
5. What is your technological proficiency?

Are you an Excel pro? Sometimes the best option is what the person using it is most familiar with. If your volunteer manager has been using one platform forever and knows it inside and out, sticking with old faithful can sometimes be your best bet.


In the end, it is most important to consider your volunteer needs, and to reexamine them often. The market changes, and so do your volunteers. Taking the time to consider whether your database is working for you, both in the larger context of your non-profit, and as it makes your volunteer manager(s) life easier, will help you stay up-to-date and on-task.



 

 

Claire leads the development of the Grassroots Growth project’s online community of practice, including the Peer Mentorship Forum and Wiki Resource Directory. She also manages relationships with Grassroots Growth partners, handles project administration, and collaborates with the Education Coordinator and Outreach Coordinator in research, training and outreach.


Tags:  Free resources  volunteer engagement  volunteer management  Volunteer Management Databases 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

In Good Company: Is your workplace ready for an employer-supported volunteering program?

Posted By Volunteer Canada, April 28, 2016
Updated: April 27, 2016

 

Employer-supported volunteering (ESV) is increasingly prevalent as businesses recognize the positive effects it has on companies, employees and quality of life in their communities.

 

ESV is any activity undertaken by an employer to encourage and support the volunteering of their employees in the community[1]. In 2013, 37% of Canada’s 12.7 million volunteers, or 4.7 million, received some type of formal support from their employer[2]. Forms of employer support include: changing hours or reducing workload; allowing use of facilities or equipment to carry out volunteer activities; providing recognition or a letter of thanks; or offering paid time off.

 

ESV benefits everyone involved, but there isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach. It is important to consider what will work for your employees. For example, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) may face different challenges than a larger corporation. Understanding the values and motivations of employees at each stage of their working lives is key to effectively engage today’s multi-generational workforces. When ESV programs are aligned with a company’s business objectives, the benefits can transfer to their bottom line by way of improved employee retention, recruitment and performance.

 

To make your ESV program sustainable, it is important to evaluate its impact, and report that impact back to the employee volunteers.

 

Interested in learning more? Consult Volunteer Canada’s Canadian Code for Employer-Supported Volunteering. You can also attend Volunteer Canada’s upcoming forum, In Good Company that will feature speakers and in-depth discussions on current issues and trends in ESV.

 

In Good Company: A Community Building Forum for Businesses and Non-Profits will take place June 8-9 at the Eaton Chelsea Hotel in Toronto, Ontario.

 

Volunteer Toronto members are invited to register at the Volunteer Canada member price.

 

Click here to register.



 

 

 

 

 

 

Volunteer Canada is the national voice for volunteerism in Canada. Since 1977, we have been committed to increasing and supporting volunteerism and civic participation. We collaborate closely with volunteer centres, local organizations and national corporations to promote and broaden volunteering. Our programs, research, training, tools, resources and national initiatives provide leadership on issues and trends in Canada’s volunteer landscape.

 


 

Tags:  Ontario Employment Standards Act  Volunteer canada  volunteer engagement  volunteer management 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Seasonal Volunteer Planning - Template Thursday

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, April 14, 2016
Updated: April 12, 2016
 Template Thursday


Will you be recruiting volunteers for summer roles this year? If so, it’s time to start planning now. Summer camps, sports groups, festivals and events will all be recruiting volunteers for summer programming over the next couple of months—to make sure you’re on track, use our free planning resource for seasonal recruitment! Feel free to download, print or photocopy this resource, taken from our Short-Term Volunteers workbook, and check out our other great resources here. Keep an eye out for more free templates in the weeks to come.

 

 

 

As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  Free resources  planning for volunteers  volunteer management  volunteer management professional development  volunteer manager resources 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Measure Twice, Cut Once - Evaluating The Effectiveness of Your Volunteer Program

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, March 16, 2016
Updated: March 14, 2016
 

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

A program evaluation is a process of reviewing all or part of a program to determine how efficiently and effectively it meets its goals. While you might be evaluating your volunteers regularly, you may not be evaluating the volunteer program itself! Through an assessment of key evaluation questions and determining proposed outcomes, you can collect data to analyze the success and impact of your volunteer program.

So why bother going through all of this effort? Here are a few great ways that a program evaluation can help you improve your volunteer program:

 

Measure efficiency

Do you sometimes struggle with finding work for volunteers to do? Do you have too many volunteers working on the same task? Your program’s efficiency can be improved by determining the work that needs to be done and the best way to do it (how many volunteers & volunteer hours, for example).

 

Measure effectiveness

Do you have a long-standing program that doesn’t meet changing needs? Are your volunteers resistant to changes that can improve program delivery? Your program’s effectiveness speaks to the success of volunteers – and their work – striving towards your organization’s mission. You can improve your volunteer program’s efficacy by understanding and eliminating the barriers to success.

 

Measure Impact

Are you going beyond efficiency and effectiveness and making lasting changes in the lives of clients? Do you know how to measure the direct impact of volunteers on clients? Even if you know your program’s impact is already felt or understood by the people who benefit from it, you can improve and advocate for your program by properly measuring and showcasing its impact. It will motivate your volunteers by showing them their impact, help you assess an overall direction for your volunteer program, and give you proof that your program is working that you can share with funders and decision makers.

 

How do you conduct an evaluation of your volunteer program in the middle of everything else you’ve got going on? Let us help you get started with “From Start to Finish: Building the Tools You Need to Evaluate your Volunteer Program” on April 21. You’ll leave this full day workshop with your evaluation questions written, logic model complete, achievable and well-planned goals established, data collection methods ready to go and a step-by-step plan to interpret your data. We’ll coach you through the process and you’ll be ready to take on your program evaluation with all the tools ready to go! Interested in learning more and signing up – click here and register today!

 

As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy Feilchenfeld develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations.

Tags:  evaluation  how to be more efficient in your volunteer program  Program evaluation  volunteer management  volunteer managers  volunteer programs  volunteers  ways to improve your volunteer program 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Building Blocks For Volunteer Planning

Posted By Ainsley Kendrick, February 11, 2016
 Road sign - success/solution

 

Lori Gotlieb presents “Building Block for Strategic Planning for Volunteers” at the 2016 VECTor Conference on March 9, 2016. Register now to choose her workshop, and check out some great tips below!

 


 

I find it interesting that when you look at the volunteer management cycle and all the components, that there is not much on strategic planning.

Are volunteer programs seen more as a support program that is focussed on responding to need or are volunteer programs moving to leadership programs where we engage volunteers in ways that may drive organizational business?

For example, what if a volunteer who had many years of project management experience offers to share their skills with the organization? Where could that fit in?

We need to start looking at strategic planning for volunteerism in a new and meaningful way.


To start, we need to understand:

 

  • Who our stakeholders are and what they need through stakeholder analysis;
  • The risks in volunteer management and the tools to minimize those risks to staff, clients and volunteers through a risk assessment;
  • Our strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats with regards to volunteer engagement through SWOT and PEST analysis;
  • The trends in the field through research and networking;

 

Once you’ve considered the above, you can then move to the next step by:

 

  • Engaging volunteers in the process;
  • Developing priorities; goals and objectives to keep on track through project management.
  • Determining an ideal end result and outcome of the process
  • Get started!

 

On March 9th join me at VECTor 2016 as we will be discussing all these points and more at my workshop on Building Blocks for Strategic Planning for Volunteerism.

 

 
 Lori Gotlieb photoLori Gotlieb is the President of Lori Gotlieb Consulting as well as co-developer and faculty member for Humber College Volunteer Management Leadership Certificate. She is a volunteer management expert who provides a unique concierge service to her clients as well as an internationally published author and workshop facilitator who has taught workshops to many diverse audiences across North America. Lori was the 2012 recipient of the Linda Buchanan Award for Excellence in Volunteer Management. 

Tags:  Executive Directors  Leadership  Non-profit strategy  Strategic Plan  Strategy  volunteer management  Volunteer Program 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Meeting The Needs of Your Organization & Volunteers In Your Volunteer Program

Posted By Katie Robinette, VECTor16 Presenter, February 4, 2016
Updated: February 3, 2016
 Hand writing notes
 

Katie W. Robinette presents “Meeting Needs: The Organization's and the Volunteer's” at the 2016 VECTor Conference on March 9, 2016. Register now to choose her workshop, and check out some great tips below!


 

 We could not do this without you.

That may be an overused phrase at Healthy Minds Canada, but it doesn’t mean it’s not true. I’ll be presenting at Volunteer Toronto’s 2016 Vector Conference on March 9th where I am looking forward to sharing two examples of just how true that statement is.

In case you haven’t heard of us, Healthy Minds Canada is a national charity in the mental health and addictions space. We fund research, run conferences and workshops, offer printed and online resources, and run a daily blog.    

With a staff of two full-time and one part-time employees, we absolutely have to leverage the enthusiasm, talent, and expertise of volunteers for every single thing we do.

Chelsea Ricchio, our Communications Manager, manages our bloggers (10 volunteers!), our social media volunteers and some event volunteers and I generally manage and oversee the rest. 

To help manage volunteers, I recruit, motivate, and mentor program and project volunteers and if you’re able to come to the Vector Conference, you’ll hear me share just how we make this work for our online Bell Let’s Talk Day awareness campaign and our ACT 4 Me youth initiative.  Our Bell Let’s Talk campaign has both a National Campaign Manager and a National Campaign Co-Chair who themselves manage a team of regional team leaders and our ACT 4 Me program is run by a Program Manager and has two supporting volunteers. 

These people all donate their time, energy, and commitment to both Healthy Minds Canada and mental health in general to make a difference.  And it’s my job to ensure that they fully appreciate the enormous impact they have on both our organization and the mental health community as a whole. 

Recruiting is challenging, interviewing is time consuming, managing volunteers can sometimes take more of an effort than doing the work myself.  But the rewards, the added reach, the different perspectives, and awesome energy volunteers bring to HMC are so rewarding that days and weeks just fly by.  And it’s way more fun celebrating a successful initiative with people than all alone.   

At VECTor 2016 I’m not only looking forward to sharing what I’ve learned and how we pull these two programs off, but to learn from others so that I can keep improving, keep building, and keep motivating. Hope to see you there! 

Katie W. Robinette joined Healthy Minds Canada in January 2013 after a long career in government relations (both for-profit and non-profit) and campaigns & elections in Canada and the US. 

Follow Katie on Twitter  or connect with her on 
LinkedIn. 

Tags:  #VECTor16  communications volunteers  leaders of volunteers  networking  VECTor 2016  Virtual volunteering  volunteer coordinators  Volunteer Management 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

INFOGRAPHIC: Assessing Your Volunteer Training Program

Posted By Kasandra James, Subscriptions Coordinator, February 2, 2016
Updated: February 1, 2016
 

Infographic: Assessing Your Volunteer Training program 

 


As Volunteer Toronto’s Subscriptions Coordinator, Kasandra James is the first point of contact for non-profits looking for support. She facilitates monthly Subscriber Circles - discussion groups for managers and coordinators of volunteers, contributes to our Sector Space newsletter and social media communications, and makes sure our subscriptions package continues to help non-profit organizations build capacity through volunteer involvement. 

 

Tags:  adult learners  Assessing your volunteer training program  How to keep volunteers  subscriber circles  volunteer engagement  Volunteer Management  Volunteer Toronto  Volunteer Training 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How Non-Profits Can Recruit and Manage Skilled Volunteers

Posted By Leila MacDonald, VECTor16 Presenter, January 14, 2016
Updated: January 13, 2016
 Senior woman smiling
 


Lelia MacDonald presents “How to Recruit & Manage Professional Volunteers” at the 2016
VECTor Conference on March 9, 2016. 
Register now to choose her workshop, and check out some great tips below!


              

A skilled volunteer is a professional who offers specific expertise, for example in HR, strategy or marketing.  Unlike volunteers who help with operations, skilled volunteers help management. 

 

Why do you need a skilled volunteer?

·      Expertise that fills a gap

·      Short term (you don’t need to nurture them over time like an employee)

·      Unbiased third party (they are not tied to the ways things used to be and they don’t have pet projects)

·      Outside perspective (they are not caught up in the daily crises, so it’s easier for them to see the big picture)


 

6 Steps For Recruiting and Managing Skilled Volunteers

 

1. Recruit

Write a job description and post on:

·      Online posting boards (such as Volunteer Toronto)

·      Your own website, LinkedIn, Facebook, and through connections of your Board of Directors

·      Local companies with a large head office

·      In Toronto, MAS is a pro bono consulting charity

 

2. Understand what is in it for them

You can pay a skilled volunteer in ways other than money.  Perhaps they want to build their resume or learn a new industry.  Perhaps they want to give back using the skills they learned in their career.  Perhaps they want to see the difference they can make.  Being open about their needs will help you trust them to stay motivated and give their project the attention it deserves.

 

3. Select

Interview them like you would a prospective employee.  Check for good listening skills, easy-to-understand language, and a spirit of collaboration.

 

4. Manage

Mutually structure the relationship like a consultant.  Draw up a proposal that defines the frequency of meetings and the topics to be investigated. 

 

5. Orient your volunteer

Even if your volunteer is only around for one project, make sure they understand the mission and structure of your organization, and that they know how their work fits into the bigger picture of what you do.

 

6. Make it worthwhile

At the end, finish with a close form.  This is how you “pay” your skilled volunteer.  It gives them a sense of accomplishment and closure.  It formalizes what they can put on their resume and what you will say as a reference.



 
Lelia MacDonald is a Volunteer Consultant with MAS, a charity that gives pro bono advice to Toronto nonprofits since 1993. MAS’s 50 Volunteer Consultants in governance, strategy, marketing, HR and fundraising are professionals who give back using the skills they learned in their careers.

Tags:  how to get volunteers for your event  Ontario  Toronto  VECTor 2016  VECTor Conference  volunteer management  volunteer recruitment  volunteering 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Be Prepared: Answers To The 5 Most Common Excuses Non-Profit Staff Use To Avoid Engaging Volunteers

Posted By Sammy Feilchenfeld, Training Coordinator, January 6, 2016
 

 Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

 

It’s a new year and you’re thinking about growing your volunteer program– more volunteers means more impact right? Well, before you get more volunteers on board, consider how that will affect the staff of your organization! Getting staff buy-in for volunteer involvement is an important step to ensuring a successful volunteer program. You might face some resistance getting volunteers–or more volunteers–engaged in your organization. Here’s a few helpful tips to help you respond to the 5 most common excuses non-profit staff use to avoid engaging volunteers:

 

It’s more trouble than it’s worth”

Volunteers bring great benefits to:

       The organization by increasing the number of work hours, skills & perspectives contributing toward achieving your mission

       The community by potentially improving the quality and types of services you provide

       The volunteers by providing valuable experience, skills and a sense of community

       The staff by teaching them supervision and management skills along with more resources available to the staff team

 

“I don’t want someone else to do my job”

 Volunteers shouldn’t be brought into do the same work as paid program staff; they should supplement that work by adding value for clients & the organization. Staff can even help create volunteer roles based on their support needs!

 

“I don’t know how to work with volunteers”

You may need to provide training for staff on some elements of volunteer management, but the added benefit is that this training will give staff a better understanding of the value of volunteer engagement.

 

“I don’t have the time”

Staff shouldn’t supervise volunteers unless it’s in their actual job description, so it should be built into the plan for those individuals’ time. Senior leadership should also provide support to these staff to develop management skills and recognize their contribution.

 

“We don’t really need volunteers”

Remember your organization’s mission – if the strategic and work plans include volunteers to achieve your goals, then the benefits are clear and volunteers should be brought on board!

 
It may be difficult to get staff to buy-in to volunteer involvement – being prepared with answers to their comments can be a great start. You should also consider providing training for your staff about the volunteer program; if you don’t know where to start, try using the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement as a guide.

If you really want to get a head start on getting staff ready for volunteers, check out Volunteer Toronto’s On-Demand Training program. Our knowledgeable and dedicated trainers will come to your space to provide training on specialized topics for an affordable price! 

 
As Volunteer Toronto's Training Coordinator, Sammy develops and delivers in-person, online and on-demand training in order to support managers and coordinators of volunteers in Toronto’s non-profit and charitable organizations. 

Tags:  How to convince staff they need volunteers  how to get staff buy-in for volunteer engagement  volunteer leaders  volunteer management  volunteer programs 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How Do YOU Inspire Action?

Posted By Melina Condren, Director of Engaging Organizations, December 10, 2015
Updated: December 10, 2015
 

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes 

Inspiration is an important part of any volunteer’s journey. It’s what makes people want to give back to their community and what motivates them to stick around, week after week, giving their time, energy and skills to a good cause. As its title suggests, this blog is all about inspiring action—and so is our upcoming conference for volunteer managers!

The schedule has just been released for VECTor (Volunteering, Engaging, Connecting Toronto) 2016, and the common theme across all workshops, panels and discussion groups is 'Inspiring Action'—how to get volunteers interested, keep them motivated and make sure you have a dedicated, driven team. We’ll hear from our amazing VECTor presenters in the months to come, but to get you thinking about inspiring action in your volunteer program, let’s take a closer look at what you can do in the months ahead.  


Tell the Volunteer Story

Nothing is more inspiring than hearing about regular people doing amazing things. Learning about your current volunteers’ impact can help potential volunteers picture themselves in the role and gain confidence in their ability to have an impact in your organization. Check out our Volunteers of Toronto site for examples of inspirational volunteer spotlights.


The Mission is the Message
 

According to the Canadian Code for Volunteer Involvement, volunteer programs should have a mission-based approach. That means that all of your volunteer positions should be clearly linked to your organization’s mission, so that volunteers can easily see how they’re making a difference and helping others.


Share Volunteer Impact 

The best way to make sure that initial inspiration doesn’t quickly fade once volunteers are faced with the realities of their work is to share with them the impact of the role. Make sure you track volunteer contributions and measure program outcomes to be able to tell volunteers exactly what it is they’re helping you accomplish.

The common thread among these three inspiration strategies is that volunteering—freely giving your time to benefit people who need your help—is inspirational in and of itself! Highlighting that through volunteer stories, mission-based roles and volunteer impact statements can help people understand how valuable volunteering can be, for themselves and for their communities.

Want to learn more about inspiring volunteer action? Check out the VECTor 2016 website and stay tuned for Registration to open in January 2016!

 
 
  Melina oversees all of Volunteer Toronto's services for organizations, including our training program, volunteer management conference, subscriptions program, and new Grassroots Growth project. Her priority is to ensure our services are effectively helping non-profits build capacity through volunteer involvement and continue to meet the
ever-evolving needs of the voluntary sector.

Tags:  get people volunteering  how to motivate volunteers  Inspiring volunteers  supervise volunteers  volunteer action  volunteer management  volunteerism  ways to volunteer 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 2 of 3
1  |  2  |  3
more Upcoming Events

2020-07-23
Volunteering for Resume Building During COVID-19

Featured Members

Organizations We Love

Volunteer Toronto Central-West (Temporarily Closed)

721 Bloor Street West, Suite 202
Toronto, ON
M6G 1L5

Mailing Address

2425 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 214
Scarborough, ON
M1K 5G8

(Virtual) Hours of Operation

MondayThursday
9:00am5:00pm

Friday: 9:00am12:00pm

T. 416-961-6888
E.
info@volunteertoronto.ca

About Us
Contact Us
Board of Directors
Staff Team


CRA# 119287092RR0001

Association Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal