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How to Include Volunteer Experience on a Resume

Posted By Volunteer Toronto , January 18, 2019
Updated: January 18, 2019
 Ask Kelly Banner

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes | Written by Josh Carlyle, volunteer blogger 


Looking for work is harder than ever and it’s important to give yourself every edge you can. Volunteering is a great way to bolster your resume and help you stand out from the crowd.

If you need help with editing your CV, you can check this custom essay writing company that offers writing and editing services tailored to your specific needs.

Volunteer experience can help make up for a lack of direct work experience, fill in gaps in employment to show that you’re eager and active, and can help you set out on a new career path by developing new skills that your current job doesn’t use. More than that, volunteer experience gives your resume personality and lets hiring managers know who you are.

That said, it can be tricky to effectively include volunteering on a resume or job application. Here are some important things to consider when listing your volunteer experience on your resume:

 

Where should volunteer experience be mentioned?

It’s important for hiring managers to know which experience is paid and which is from volunteering. This means that most resumes should list volunteer experience in a separate section after work experience as listing both in the same chronological section can easily be confusing. A separate section will be more clear, easier to read, and catch recruiters’ attention.

However, if you don’t have much paid work experience under your belt, you can opt to include both paid and volunteer experience in the same section. If you do so be careful to clearly label volunteer positions and to title the section “Experience” so as to not mislead anyone.

 

How long did you volunteer for?

It’s useful to consider the length of your volunteering when considering how to list your experience because long-term volunteering will carry more weight than short term positions.

 If you have a number of short-term positions it’s usually enough to list the year when you volunteered and the organization you were helping. Long-term volunteering can be expanded a bit more—use that space to describe the role and how you made it your own like you would for your work experience.

 

What information is most relevant to your application?

Hiring managers read a lot of resumes and they read them FAST. If something isn’t relevant to the job posting it will often be passed over. So take your time and consider how each of your volunteer experiences relates to the position you’re applying for. Be sure to focus on the most relevant parts and don’t be afraid to leave irrelevant details out, you’ll have an opportunity to expand on your resume if you’re selected for an interview.

This doesn't mean that you should exclude volunteering that SEEMS irrelevant however. Often, a volunteer role may seem unrelated to a particular job but actually offers a number of ‘soft skills’ that help make your case. Things like teamwork or leadership skills, time management skills, and communication skills are all great things to include.

When writing your resume make sure to give the best possible impression of yourself that you can. Use a professional tone and focus on how all of your experiences contribute to the value that you offer employers.

With these tips and tricks, we hope you'll consider including volunteer experience in your resume!

 

Josh Carlyle is a writing expert and marketing manager at Write my essay today, who is experienced in content creation and copywriting. Working at Writing Guru , Josh is aware of the latest trends in education as well as online business. He is always willing to share his knowledge and ideas and write for the blogs from the insights of a professional businessperson.

Tags:  how to write a volunteer resume  job experience  Volunteer questions  Volunteering  Volunteerism 

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The Volunteer Behind Getting Financial Literacy in the Classroom

Posted By Volunteer Toronto, September 28, 2017
Updated: August 1, 2017

Daniel Rotsztain Fake Development Proposal

Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

 

Prakash Amarasooriya is a volunteer with the Toronto Youth Cabinet. He recently succeeded in campaigning to have financial literacy education added to Ontario’s Grade 10 curriculum. Prakash is one of 25 Toronto volunteers recognized with a 2017 Legacy Award for their exceptional contributions. This is his story as a volunteer.

 

Graduate in flux

In 2015, I graduated with a health sciences degree, but around the same time I decided I wanted to go in a different direction. I actually had my eye on business; I saw there was more of a need to drive meaningful change. So, I applied for 170 jobs. Without success. It was discouraging, but I kept going and trusting the process. In January 2016, I stumbled into a job opportunity at TD with no bank experience.

As the same time, I was watching HBO's TV show, The Wire. Season four was all about flaws in the education system, and I saw a lot of parallels to the real world. I had also seen the memes online joking about how young people were taught about things like parabolas but not how to do their own taxes. They felt they had missed out on learning life skills, and I did too. As my work began at TD, I also started to understand the value of financial literacy. What was a savings account? What is a TFSA? I noticed there were a lot of parents who were not financially stable—always in overdraft, or having loans rejected without knowing why. Without help, they would normalize the problem and pass these patterns onto their children. I realized things needed to change from a young age, and that is when I started to link financial literacy to education.

 Around the same time, I knew I wanted to get involved with the City of Toronto. I typed, “young people getting involved in Toronto” into Google and the Toronto Youth Cabinet showed up. The Toronto Youth Cabinet is a semi-autonomous advisory body to the City of Toronto with a space at City Hall.

 

Wheels in motion

I emailed Tom Gleason, Executive Director of the Toronto Youth Cabinet in January 2016 (also a 2017 Legacy Award recipient). I described the gap I saw in financial literacy, and said that I wanted to get involved. They did not yet have anyone for education, so Tom asked if I wanted to be that guy. A working group was then formed to respond to this need.

After joining, I began the research. What was currently being done? What were people saying regarding financial literacy in Canada? I knew that I wanted to see a tangible change, but I also wanted to identify the path of least resistance. So I developed a proposal. I had no templates or experience, just answers to questions I found along the way. Based on my research (and a couple of epiphany moments), I decided that the Grade 10 careers course would be an obtainable measure of success; a foot-in-the-door to start the financial literacy conversation. So my goal was decided—but how do I get this implemented?

 

Campaigning as a volunteer

My first step: connect with the Toronto school boards. I personally emailed each of the trustees, met with them, developed relationships, and asked them to help me advocate for financial literacy. You’d be surprised how willing people are to speak with you, especially if you reach out with respect and genuine curiosity. Eventually, I met with two Provincial curriculum advisors, but it did not go well. They said they had not heard any complaints regarding the current state of financial literacy in schools.

 

Strategy pivot

Despite the government’s discouraging initial reaction, I knew there was a need that the public would support. So I released a petition supporting the proposal on Thanksgiving 2016, gathering 100 names through my personal Facebook. The next day, I sent a press release to key media representatives. Hours later, CityTV called and wanted to interview me. This led to three weeks of media interviews, during which the petition grew and the government changed their stances, agreeing to meet with me again.

On the day of my last scheduled media interview, I was invited to meet with Mitzie Hunter, the new Minister for Education. It was November 1st (fun fact: I forgot it was my birthday that day). My aim was to approach her as cooperatively as possible, positioning a revision to the careers course as a win-win. She had a few questions, but was in full support of the proposal. The one I created—a youth volunteer—with no template. “Did we just win?” Tom and I asked each other as we left the room. We were excited, but wanted to see the results first.

 

A win, but not the end

Two days later, Minister Hunter tweeted, "We’ve heard you Toronto Youth Cabinet. We’ve accepted your proposal". We had won. And since then, the government has met with me to receive feedback on their plan moving forward. Twenty-eight Ontario schools piloted a new course this past spring. The revised course will formally begin in September 2018.

Reflecting, I am happy the government has committed, but there is still much work to be done. I did this for the people who need it, who signed that petition, and who supported the initiative from the beginning. The course is one thing, but peer-to-peer, and parent-to-child conversations are another. Ultimately, the goal was raising consciousness in having these conversations about money management. I continue to attend financial literacy events and spread the message. Last month, I even became a board member—a goal I set for myself after attending a Volunteer Toronto ‘Becoming a Board Member’ workshop—for the Canadian Foundation for Economic Education.

 

My advice to youth

My advice on work/life/volunteer balance? I only do the things that I know I would fight for when I am beyond exhausted. If you see unmet needs in your community, be agile and work with the administration to drive change. Never take no as your final answer: it's just short for “not this way.” I did not know how my proposal would end up; just that I would fight for as long as it took to succeed. When I get older, I always want to be conscious of not underestimating young people, because I have been in the position where people underestimate just how much I can do. 

 

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Tags:  40 High School Community service hours  Career  City of Toronto Volunteers  How to give back  job experience  Legacy Awards  skilled volunteering  Skilled Volunteers  Teen volunteering  Toronto volunteers  Volunteer  volunteering for youth  volunteering in Toronto  Volunteerism  What's It Like To Volunteer  Youth Support  Youth Volunteers 

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Gaining Work Experience as a Newcomer to Toronto

Posted By Volunteer Toronto, November 18, 2015
Updated: November 17, 2015
 
 
 Photo from New To Canada Website
 

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes 

Are you new to Toronto? Interested in finding ways to gain employment, improve your English skills and connect with your community? Volunteering could be your ticket to achieving all of those things!

Finding work in Toronto is a struggle for many people, but for newcomers, the barrier is even greater. It might be because some employers and regulatory bodies require Canadian experience as a legitimate job requirement. Other employers may simply want to ensure that you are aware of Canadian employment standards or may not have practices in place to evaluate your language and communication skills.  

When you volunteer, you have the opportunity to get work experience, make connections for work references, make new friends and learn more about the city where you live. 

So, how do you get started volunteering? Below, Karen Raittinen-DeSario, an Outreach Volunteer withVolunteer Toronto, answers some common questions to help you get started:

 

What is volunteering?  

The act of volunteering is the giving of time and service, usually at non-profits (organizations that don’t exist to make a profit but instead serve a certain cause ) and community organizations.


What is the time commitment?

Volunteer opportunities can vary in length of time and depend on the type of activity and your availability. You can volunteer for an event held on a specified day, this is called a "special event." When you commit to an organization for less than three months, it is called a "short-term" opportunity. Lastly, a "long-term" opportunity is one that will last for more than three months.

 

Can I volunteer if I don’t have Canadian references?  Do I need a work permit? 

"References can come from your country of origin, do not need to be from employers and can come from other sources such as friends, landlords or workers.  A work permit is not needed, and you can volunteer on a visitor or student visa."

 

I want to practice my English, what type of volunteer opportunities should I look for?


Looking for opportunities that are predominantly task based will allow you to meet new people and practice your English-speaking skills.  When using the Volunteer Toronto website, look for special events, working with animals, helping with donations and working with newcomers and farmers markets, as these opportunities are better suited for people who are learning English. 

 

How do I start? 

To get started you must Reflect, Research, Reach Out. Ask yourself, what are my interests? What are my skills? How much time can I offer? What do I want to gain? Go to "Volunteer Opportunities" on the Volunteer Toronto website to explore all the available positions.  Apply by following the instructions in the position description. Contact the person listed if you have any questions. Volunteer Toronto’s How To Start Volunteering page is another great resource to help you start your volunteering journey.

 

Karishma Mohammed moved to Canada in 2014 from Trinidad and Tobago, when asked what surprised her about volunteering, she responded: 

“My initial intention was to be involved in a charity that would 'look good' on my resume but, when I actually became more involved in volunteer work, it took a life of its own. … I got so much in return, I met people from all walks of life, I learned to appreciate that good ideas can come from anywhere and that no one is too old or young to volunteer.”

 

 

Jaime Yumiseva from Ecuador, also moved to Canada in 2014. When reflecting on his volunteer contributions he said:

“My most rewarding experience has been being able to contribute to committed organizations, committed administrators and committed attendees. Volunteering allows me to see how my time influences the life of somebody else, even if it is for a short while … and has made me realize that there is so much more to give. Volunteering is my way to share my happiness and knowledge with others.”

   

If you have a hyper specialized skill it is likely you won't find a volunteer opportunity that allows you to gain that specific experience here in Toronto. Try breaking down the components of that skill and research the volunteer opportunities that might fit the experience you need.

Join Karen this Thursday, November 19, at 6 pm at Volunteer Toronto’sVolunteering As A Newcomer to Canada session.  You will have the opportunity to get additional information, ask her more questions and also hear stories from newcomers who volunteered shortly after arriving in Canada. This event is free of charge and there are only a few spots left!

Can’t attend on Thursday? Book a free, 30-minute, one-on-one appointment with a referral counsellor. They can help you find the volunteer opportunity that is right for you. Visit the Contact Us page for other ways to reach us.

Also, feel free to post any questions in the comment section below.

 

 

 

Tags:  Canadian work experience  finding work experience  finding work in Toronto  How to get work experience  How to start volunteering  job experience  new immigrant  newcomers to Toronto  on work experience  unemployment  Volunteering as a newcomer 

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