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Legacy Awards - 2018 Recipients
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After receiving more than 100 nominations, we are delighted to announce the recipients of the 2018 Legacy Awards!

Volunteer Toronto’s Legacy Awards celebrates 25 Toronto volunteers for their outstanding contributions to the community. From mentors to fundraisers to educators, the Awards shine a light on the unspoken heroes whose efforts are often unknown outside their local community.

On April 19th 2018, during National Volunteer Week, a private ceremony will take place with the winners, nominators and special guests to celebrate their achievements. 

For more information on the Legacy Award recipients, contact Cara Eaton, Marketing and Communications Manager. 



 

Award Recipients

 
Click on their names to learn more about their impact

Harold Averill
Michael Blake
Tatyana Buntin
Maria Carrusca
Michael Chomyn
Anne Creighton

Sheridan Cyrus
Barbara Gill-Lazroe
Andrew Greaves
Birgit Grimberger
Edna Hawkins
Katie Heggtveit

Douglas Hodge
Michael James
Terry Kavanagh
Emily Krula
Adam Lake
Jim Milton

Paul Nguyen
Patrick Robinson
Lorna Rosenstein
Ronnie Seagren
Carla Whillier
Val Woodford
Anna Zachariah

 Past Recipients

 

 The 2016 Recipients

 The 2017 Recipients




Harold Averill

Harold Averill

Harold is dedicated to growing and maintaining Canada’s LGBTQ* history. Volunteering with the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (CLGA) since its infancy, he has worn many hats, including chief archivist, president and board member.

Harold has shaped the CLGA into the influential organization that it is today—he was instrumental to achieving charitable status in 1981, ensuring doors remained open throughout the AIDS crisis, and has worked with the Operations Committee to locate, acquire, and process LGBTQ* material since its foundation. Harold is also a co-founder of the CLGA’s National Portrait Collection, a showcase of LGBTQ* Canadians who’ve made a significant cultural, social, or political impact.

In addition to his volunteer work at the CLGA—now over 500 hours annually—and his full-time job at the University of Toronto Archives, Harold also lent his time and experience to the Archivist Association of Ontario and the Toronto Area Archivists Group.” 

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Michael Blake

Michael Blake

Michael uses his skills as a trim carpenter to give low-income families a hand-up rather than a hand-out. Since retiring, Michael has become a staple at Habitat for Humanity build sites, working tirelessly rain, sleet, or shine.

As a crew leader on over 180 builds, Michael instills a feeling of accomplishment in other volunteers, helping them develop new skills and encouraging them to take pride in what they have built. Known for his magnetic personality, over 11,000 hours of volunteering, Michael creates a community with other volunteers and partner families. His caring personality and warmth has often attracted the interest of the youngest residents, who have been known to follow him around as they build their new home.

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Tatyana Buntin

Tatyana Buntin

At 18, Tatyana dedicates herself to working with youth and increasing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) literacy. Tatyana discovered volunteering as a homework club facilitator and as a manager of a computer skills training program. She also helped run children’s recreational programs with Four Villages Community Health Centre and is a Youth Facilitator with the Community STEM Clubs program, run by Visions of Science.

Developing and facilitating programming to engage youth from underrepresented communities, she has worked with over 200 community members and has inspired the creation of the STEM Community Leaders Program.

Initially nervous about volunteering outside her home neighbourhood—Swansea Mews—Tatyana was enthusiastically embraced when she stepped outside her comfort zone. Her confidence and wealth of experience will serve her well as she pursues her goal of becoming a Child and Youth Worker.

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Maria Carrusca

Maria Carrusca

“I’ve found my next passion,” explains Maria, explaining the decision to sell her drapery business in order to give more time to food rescue.

Committed to serving her local community, Maria is a founding member of RoncyWorks—an organization that tends street gardens and cleans up litter. Branching out she began volunteering with the Roncesvalles United Church’s meal program and was the driving force in its transformation into Dinner with Dignity. “I didn’t want us to be a soup kitchen, slopping food on a plate,” Maria explains, “I wanted it to be dinner with dignity; with cutlery, napkins, real plates, and dessert.”

Maria has inspired her community, prompting business owners to donate food and her neighbours to volunteer.

Recognizing the risks facing Toronto’s homeless population during this past winter’s cold spells, Maria began collaborating with Michael Chomyn, a fellow Dinner with Dignity volunteer and Legacy Award recipient, to roll out More than Soup—which has already delivered to soup, warm clothing, and TTC tokens to over 1000 people on the street and at warming centres across the city.

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Michael Chomyn

Michael Chomyn

“It’s humbling to know that from a small idea I had, the impact was felt on the other side of the planet,” says Michael, reflecting on his work as Operations Director of Not Just Tourists Toronto—a volunteer-run non-profit that recruits tourists to deliver medical supplies to clinics abroad. Under Michael’s direction they began stockpiling specialized paediatric equipment alongside basic medical supplies, allowing them to provide more directed support.

Michael’s passion for poverty alleviation led him to the Dinner with Dignity program at Roncesvalles United Church, where he has volunteered for the past two years. When he learned about the worsening shelter conditions during one of this winter’s worst cold spells he sprang into action, mobilizing volunteers to provide hot soup to those in need. Able to provide 600 bowls of soup over the first weekend alone, the operation soon evolved into More than Soup, a volunteer-run organization that delivers soup, snacks, clothing, and TTC tokens to the vulnerably housed.

For Michael volunteering comes from the heart, he is living proof that if someone truly believes in a cause, they will work harder and have more dedication. According to his fellow volunteer, "Michael spends countless hours every week helping others, and does so with a smile and a laugh that spreads optimism and motivation to those around him.”

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Anne Creighton

Anne Creighton

Described by her peers as a “powerhouse for positive change,” Anne has channeled her energy into helping people overcome barriers.

Anne was originally inspired to volunteer for the Canadian National Institute for the Blind when she learned from a visually impaired classmate that no recording of their textbook was available. She shifted her advocacy focus in support of children who “age out” of care after adopting her own children through the Catholic Children’s Aid Society. She has since chaired the Catholic Children’s Aid Society of Toronto and currently serves as a committee member of Covenant House.

Anne is particularly concerned with advocating for the rights of children who, like her own daughter, identify as LGBTQ*. She is president of Toronto Pflag , leading a team of volunteers who provide guidance and resources to families wanting to better understand, support, and protect their transgender children.

Generous with her time, Anne answers a telephone support line, chairs peer-support meetings, conducts workshops in schools, and meets with parents one-on-one to provide emotional support. Anne has also co-led a volunteer team that partnered with advertising agency J. Walter Thompson to produce an extremely well-received TTC poster campaign addressing the use of sensitive language when children come out of the closet and organizes an annual flag-raising ceremony at Toronto City Hall to commemorate the International Day against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia.

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Sheridan Cyrus

Sheridan Cyrus

For 31 years the Malvern Family Resource Centre (MFRC) delivered its programs and services in transient spaces, forcing community members and staff to travel to changing locations. Sheridan became the driving force behind the construction of a new, permanent community centre after persistent lobbying led to a donation of land and funds. Securing additional financial support from the community, Sheridan hired an architect, and worked closely with the construction team to ensure the project was completed on time.

Now his legacy stands; a brand new 24,000 square foot community centre. Community members—including many isolated seniors and families with young children—may now safely and reliably reach the MFRC’s services and programs. Since moving into its new home, the MFRC has been able to expand its programming and reach, seeing a nearly 20% increase in attendance.

Finding motivation from “the joy in the faces of the children and adults” attending the building’s opening, Sheridan is known not only for his determination, but for the positive attitude he brings to all of his volunteer work and his ability to motivate and lead others.

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Barb Gill-Lazroe

Barbara Gill-Lazroe

Barbara has a long history of compassion and volunteerism. She was a candy-striper in high school and has been involved in social justice, anti-war, and anti-racism activities since the late ‘60s.

When she lost her son to cancer at the age of 13, Barbara found support at the Toronto chapter of Bereaved Families of Ontario (BFO). Shortly after she took the BFO’s facilitator training course and began volunteering to support other bereaved parents. Over the past 25 years she has provided support and hope to thousands of parents. After losing her husband, brother, and parents, Barbara began volunteering with BFO’s other programs for bereaved spouses, children, and siblings.

Barbara chairs BFO’s Professional Advisory Committee, helping ensure that they meet the current and emerging needs of the bereaved. She is behind BFO’s newfound focus on providing greater mental health support.

In the words of her nominator, “ours is not a society comfortable with death… The reality, however, is that at some point in our lives, we will be bereaved and we will need support”—Barbara has been instrumental to providing that support.

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Andrew Greaves

Andrew Greaves

Within a few weeks of his arrival as a gay refugee claimant, Andrew started volunteering with Access Alliance’s LGBTQ+ newcomer initiatives. Since then, he has contributed over 250 volunteer hours leading and participating in workshops, organizing pride events, and sharing his journey.

Andrew was the creative force behind a newcomer-led cooking program—bringing together discussion of culture, cuisine, and migration—and has trained as a peer support volunteer, accompanying newcomers to appointments across the city.

In a short time, Andrew has developed into a powerful role model for his peers. In the words of his nominator, Andrew’s “generosity of spirit, positive attitude and commitment to volunteering are exemplary… he is offering back to his community while he himself is [still] very much in the resettlement process.”

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Birgit Grimberger

Birgit Grimberger

As a child, Birgit was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis (NF). Though one in 3000 babies are diagnosed each year, there is very little awareness about the condition. Upon meeting a woman whose sister had also been diagnosed, Birgit co-founded the Neurofibromatosis Society of Ontario (NFON) in 1985 to connect individuals with NF, increase awareness, and increase rates of early recognition and diagnoses.

Today, sitting on NFON’s board, Birgit contributes to various fundraising and awareness-raising activities and frequently visits individuals in the hospital—providing much-needed comfort to those whose families live far away. She has likewise provided emotional support to families dealing with the diagnosis of their child.

One of Birgit’s most memorable volunteer moments was being interviewed about NF on national television. She was able to speak about neurofibromas, small tumours on the skin, which are the source of many harmful myths and stigmas.

Beyond her work with the NFON Birgit is a dedicated community builder; she has also worked with Salvation Army as a long-time volunteer.

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Edna Hawkins

Edna Hawkins

After retiring from the YMCA, Edna decided to form a knitting group in order to stay connected to her community and stay active. The group meets every week, and over the last 16 years has produced over 5000 hand-knit pieces for charities that have grown to rely on their donations.

They have knit celebratory holiday hats for Hanukkah, Christmas, and Lunar New Year; tiny blankets and hats for premature babies; pieces for mothers who miscarry at the hospital; and hundreds of hats, scarves, and headbands to help low-income Torontonians and their children stay warm during harsh winters.

One of Edna’s most cherished volunteer memories is sending 200 blankets to Canadian troops stationed in Kandahar, Afghanistan and receiving a letter of thanks in return. Looking forward, this year the group is focused on producing “twiddlemuffs,” designed to comfort veterans, people living with Alzheimer’s, and those struggling with cognitive disabilities.

Edna continues to motivate and encourage the group, her nominator describes how “every staff member knows and loves her and to say she is a pillar of their community is such an understatement!” For Edna, though, it is entirely a team effort, “I’ve made a lot of friends and had a lot of happy times in this place” she says, “All different people from different walks of life. I couldn’t wish for a nicer group of women to join me for knitting.”

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Katie Heggtveit

Katie Heggtveit

Volunteering first became a major part of Katie’s life in high school, where she was required to complete 40 volunteer hours per semester, rather than the typical 40 hours over four years. She completed an international service tour and volunteered her time at a nursery for abandoned, neglected, orphaned or disabled babies and toddlers in Kingston, Jamaica.

Her experience inspired her to volunteer at a shelter upon returning home to London, Ontario. Since moving to Toronto four years ago, Katie has volunteered with numerous organizations—including Trek for Teens Foundation, Youth Without Shelter, Horizons for Youth, Ryerson University, ME to WE, MLSE Foundation, TREC Education, and Blyth Academy.

Last summer, she founded her own organization, Bootcamps for Change. This initiative has partnered with 35 fitness professionals to hold fitness classes in Toronto youth shelters; fundraised for Jays Care Foundation, the Toronto Humane Society, and Sick Kids; and run an activewear drive to reduce barriers to participation faced by some youth in shelters. Bootcamps for Change volunteers who want to pursue a career in fitness and nutrition can take advantage of Katie’s free resume and cover letter writing/interview preparation sessions.

Katie is also full-time Nutrition and Food Student at Ryerson University and runs a health consulting business. Not only is she passionate about poverty alleviation but she strives to change the public’s view of individuals experiencing poverty and homelessness. She is pursuing a Masters in Philanthropy and Non-profit Leadership so that she can continue to follow her passion both locally and internationally.

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Doug Hodge

Douglas Hodge

Douglas has been an active volunteer in his community for many years. Starting out as an assistant coach to his sons’ lacrosse team he quickly became a “go-to guy” around the neighbourhood.

Fifteen years ago Douglas began volunteering with Scadding Court’s Gone Fishin’ program. This unique program transforms the indoor pool at Scadding Court Community Centre into a trout pond once a year—giving local school groups, children and youth living with physical disabilities and special needs, as well as the general public, the opportunity to experience the excitement of catching a fish right in their own backyard. Each year Douglas assists with fish delivery and event set-up; helps participants fix their fishing lines, rods, and reels; assists those having difficulty catching a fish; and, finally, helps with clean up.

To date, Douglas has volunteered nearly 1500 hours and has made an impact on the lives of thousands of Gone Fishin’ participants. One of his fondest memories is of helping a little girl catch her first fish and then seeing her return, years later, helping her own daughter. Gone Fishin’ is, for Douglas, both a community and a family affair.

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Michael James

Michael James

When Michael was hired to manage a computer lab for seniors he thought it was just another of his many careers. What he didn’t expect was to become one of the faces for the United Way’s fundraising campaigns

As a 12 year volunteer with the United Way Speakers’ Bureau Michael has presented to more than 20,000 people. Now he mentors his fellow speakers—youth, seniors, newcomers, and people with trauma—building their public speaking skills, raising their confidence, and helping them make the impact that their stories deserve.

Michael has developed his own training materials and delivers over 20 writing and public speaking workshops each year. This past year alone his students have inspired over 60,000 people to support local community initiatives.

Michael is also the Founder and Creative Director of the innovative United Way event Songs of the City. Bringing together speakers and singer-songwriters to create an evening of storytelling, Songs of the City demonstrates the impact a donation can make. As a former singer, actor, and president of the board at Equity Showcase, Michael drew on his industry connections to recruit producers and artists, including Lousie Pitre, Shakura S'Aida, Molly Johnson, and Thom Allison. Since its successful debut in 2015 Michael has helped Songs of the City spread—United Way chapters in Halifax, Moncton, and Fredericton have now adopted the event.

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Terry Kavanagh

Terry Kavanagh

As a survivor of the 200 Wellesley Street East fire, Terry was inspired by the outpouring of support he received from his community. It was at this moment that he decided to volunteer in order to give back to his community.

For the past seven years, Terry has facilitated the Toronto Christian Resource Centre’s (CRC) music program. Entirely self-taught, Terry started playing guitar professionally as a teenager. He has now taught over a hundred individuals how to play new instruments. He guides participants through the sometimes frustrating process of learning a new instrument with patient guidance, leaving his pupils empowered and determined.

Terry is also a founding member of Inspired Souls, the CRC house band. The band is made up of Regent Park community members, street affiliated people, and people living with addictions. Inspired Souls performs for free at community events, many of whose organizers cannot afford to hire musicians. The CRC’s music program helps many of its participants overcome social isolation, build confidence, and discover a new passion. One of Terry’s most memorable experiences was performing with Inspired Souls at the Mattamy Center and helping a shy singer overcome her nerves to perform a classic country song.

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Emily Krula

Emily Krula

Emily learned the importance of community at a young age, seeing her mother found an organization to provided meals to newcomers during the Depression. Volunteering with Copernicus Lodge, a non-profit seniors’ residence, since its foundation she has been instrumental to building a sense of belonging and purpose amongst residents.

Serving on the board of directors for over 40 years Emily is one of the original founders of both the Auxiliary and the Auxiliary-operated “Aggies” Tuck Shop for residents. By involving residents in regular events—yard sales, BBQs, and the Christmas Bazaar—they have been able to foster community and foster active living while raising over 1 million dollars to improve services. Emily has also served on the Lodge’s Foundation Board, building committee, and admissions committee. At 85, she is described as the Lodge’s “strongest advocate and supporter.”/p>

Emily has participated in many other worthy causes in her volunteer career—she has been a member of the Katyn Memorial Committee, president of the High Park Liberal Association, and a member of the Ontario Advisory Council for Multi-culturalism.

One of Emily’s fondest volunteering memories came in the ‘70s when she was president of the Marie Curie-Sklodowska Association, Emily and her fellow members assisted a young family who had escaped communist Poland—providing clothing, household goods, and helping them obtain employment. “I felt so very fortunate to have been able to help,” she explains, “this experience helped me, for maybe the first time, not take for granted the freedoms of being a Canadian.”

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Adam Lake

Adam Lake

Adam’s dedication to empowerment and learning shines through his wealth of volunteer work. He is the co-founder of Books Breaking Barriers—which delivers donated books to prisoners—and currently interns with LegalSwipe, an app development firm working to help all Ontarians know their rights when interacting with police.

He has taken on a wide spectrum of roles—mentoring children and youth across the city with The Peer Project; performing outreach with BlaqueOUT and the Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention; supporting Africans in Partnership Against AIDS as an events volunteer; and working with the LGBTW Youth Line as a peer support worker.

Looking to the future Adam hopes to attend law school to shed light on the limitations of Canadian law and explore the effects that a that a history of racial segregation, marginalization, and enslavement have had on individuals of African descent.

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Jim Milton

Jim Milton

When Jim retired, he knew that he wanted to give back to his community and began his volunteer journey with LAMP Community Health Centre ASK! as a community support worker and helping out at the emergency food bank.

His greatest impact, however, has been in his role as Commissioner of Taking Affidavits. He volunteers two days weekly, using his expertise completing affidavits, certifying true copies, and producing monthly reports on LAMP CHC’s services. In the past year, he completed approximately 1000 true copies and affidavits for vulnerable and marginalized community members—including those living in poverty, the homeless, isolated seniors, and newcomers.

Jim also helps community members with literacy or language barriers with a wide array of government forms, including CPP, OAS, and ODSP applications, letters to Toronto Community Housing, and statutory declarations for immigration. He takes great joy in helping low-income individuals access the resources available to them, helping them to vastly improve their quality of life. “People are frightened of government forms” he explains, “one client came to us to file for CPP, OAS, and GIS at the age of 70 because they put off applying for years. They had no money but by the time we got the applications filed and accepted they were receiving over $1000 per month and were able to eat properly and enjoy life. Very satisfying!”

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Paul Nguyen

Paul Nguyen

Paul has come a long way since making King Fu movies with his friends. Since 2004 he has launched over 400 videos on Jane-Finch.com, a self-financed grassroots project that combats negative stereotypes about the Jane-Finch community. He’s made music videos, news clips, short documentaries, and more covering a wide range of topics—from politics to culture.

Paul’s YouTube channel has over 14 million views, made national headlines, and many of the young reporters, writers, and artists he has featured have gone on to win awards and scholarships for their work on Jane-Finch.com. Most importantly, he has given a new pride and a voice to residents of his community—providing them with a space to express their art, concerns, and ideas to the wider public.

Beyond his work with Jane-Finch.com, Paul makes sure that he takes time to volunteer at local events that paint the neighbourhood in a positive light, such as Argos player Jamal Campbell’s recent visit to local schools. He has been invited to speak about diversity and youth engagement across the country and was included in a list of noteworthy historical figures for Asian Heritage Month by the Government of Canada.

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Patrick Robinson

Patrick Robinson

“I can't describe the feeling” says Patrick, explaining an instance when his emergency response contributed to saving a life, “other than [as] an overwhelming urge to continue helping people”

Patrick is a staple volunteer with Emergency Response Team Search and Rescue (ERTSAR)—a UN recognised disaster response search and rescue team that deploys locally and around the world. He has one of the highest personal attendance records on his team despite being an independent business owner and single parent—he can be seen keeping the public safe year around at events like the CNE or the Nathan Philips Square New Year’s Eve celebration.

Patrick has undertaken medical training and additional rescue and emergency response training at his own expense. Dedicated to improving his team, Patrick readily passes on his knowledge and skills to fellow team members, recruits new volunteers, and donates his extra supplies to fellow volunteers facing financial difficulties.

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Lorna Rosenstein

Lorna Rosenstein

By age 40, Lorna was diagnosed both with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative and hereditary eye condition, and with cancer.

A firm believer in the mantra, "it's not what you have that matters; it’s what you do with what you have,” she co-Founded the Gilda's Club Greater Toronto, an organization which supports those diagnosed with cancer, as well as their families and friends, feeling that no one should suffer cancer alone.

Lorna is likewise a leader in the fight against blindness. She has represented Canada as a board member of Retina International and served on the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ Board of Directors for 17 years. Lorna has acted as a key-note motivational speaker at several of the Foundation’s Vision Quest Conferences. These annual conferences allow people living with an eye disease and their families to learn about the latest research and treatment options, as well as to meet similarly affected individuals. Lorna continues to support the Foundation’s work by raising funds for, and helping plan, Cycle for Sight, an annual cycling race from Toronto to Blue Mountain.

The Foundation’s current Director of Philanthropy recalls how hearing Lorna’s address in 1998 gave her family “the hope to realize that our then 5-year-old son’s future did not have to be bleak” and motivated her to co-found Comic Vision, a fundraiser that will soon celebrate its 20th year and has raised $8.4 million to date.

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Ronnie Seagren

Ronnie Seagren

Ronnie is a dedicated environmental activist and was instrumental in transitioning Ecologos from an environmental think tank to the direct-action organization it is today—using the arts, documentary in particular, to raise awareness and mobilize individuals in the pursuit water conservation.

She has volunteered as Secretary of Ecologos’ Board and has participated in both the Design Team and the Water Docs Film Festival Programming Team. She is a vocal advocate and, each year, she works to secure the funding that helps Ecologos continue its work.

Ronnie connects directly with small businesses, non-profits, and libraries to get the word out about Ecologos’ programs and is eagerly encourages her own connections to give their time. In the words of her nominator, “Ronnie is the sort of "nose to the grindstone" volunteer we all long for and deeply admire.”

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Carla Whillier

Carla Whillier

With a strong belief in humanitarianism instilled by her family at a young age, Carla has sculpted her legal practice to focus on mental health law.

Her interest in representing vulnerable populations led her to become an active member of the Life and Hope Foundation/Chai-Tikvah and she is currently a director for Homes First Society—which both provide independent and supportive housing for people with mental health issues.

Carla is also passionate about sharing knowledge and inspiring the future. Since 2010, she has volunteered teaching law and legal procedure at the Ontario Justice Education Network—playing a key role in motivating youth to pursue meaningful extracurricular activities and postsecondary education. She has also been a mentor with Girl's E-Mentorship since 2016, a program that inspires high school girls facing socio-economic barriers to build leadership skills, helping them reach their full potential.

Carla considers her most rewarding volunteer role to be at Camp Trillium—the sleep-away camp for children with cancer where she has volunteered for over 12 years. “You have absolutely no idea how life will turn out,” she explains “and these super hero kids are living life to the fullest. Camp Trillium is the most magical place on earth and I am so thankful to have the opportunity to be a part of it.”

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Val Woodford

Velvat "Val" Woodford

Described as “a bright light to those who find themselves in the dark,” Val has overcome experiences of poverty, post-traumatic stress and the loss of her husband.

Through her mission of poverty alleviation, Val gives her time generously, working with a number of non-profits in her community—cooking meals at St. John the Compassionate; stocking shelves and cleaning up at Eternal Bread of Life Ministries; and delivering food, clothing, and hygiene products with the City Street Outreach team and Garth Soso World Ministries.

Outside of formal volunteer commitments, Val lends a hand to whoever is in need. She’s been known to organize clothing and furniture drives for families and individuals who have had to dispose of their belongings as a result of bed bugs. She frequently volunteers at community events, pitching in with set-up and clean-up. And she has even been known to invite those on the verge of homelessness to sleep on her own couch.

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Anna Zachariah

Anna Zachariah

Anna has long leveraged her dynamism and legal expertise to advocate for vulnerable populations in her community. She has volunteered in a number of leadership roles—serving on the board of Multilingual Community Interpreter Services; as treasurer of the South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario; and as Director of West Scarborough Community Legal Services.

Since 2012, she has served on the board of the Ontario Society of Senior Citizens Organizations (OSSCO). In this role, she has met with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, identifying issues centred around pharmacare, caregiver needs, elder abuse prevention, and elderly persons centres. In 2013 the OSSCO was facing a crisis—they were at risk of losing their charitable status and funding. Anna worked with the board and staff to develop new controls, policies, and procedures, ensuring that they could continue their work.

Anna is likewise passionate about poverty alleviation and volunteers at St. John’s Anglican Church, helping to provide hot meals and hygiene products to the homeless. Last year she took on another challenge, joining the Ontario Health Coalition Board, in order to prevent hospital privatization.

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For media inquiries regarding the 2018 Legacy Award recipients, please contact:

Cara Eaton
Marketing and Communications Manager
ceaton@volunteertoronto.ca
416-961-6888 ext 231



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